NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP)



"The NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP) acts as the US government’s lead for addressing marine debris. The mission of the MDP is to investigate and prevent the adverse impacts of marine debris and achieves this through five main pillars: Removal, Prevention, Research, Regional Coordination, and Emergency Response. MDP staff is positioned across the U.S. in order to support projects and partnerships with state and local agencies, tribes, non-governmental organizations, academia, and industry. The NOAA Marine Debris Program offers an assortment of educational resources, including fact sheets, reports, curriculum, photos, and videos. All content is in the public domain and can be utilized at no charge with appropriate credit."

NOAA-Impacts1

A Marine Debris team member disentangling a Laysan Albatross chick from a small derelict fishing net. (Credit: NOAA CREP)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts2

Entangled hawksbill sea turtle in Hawaii. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts3

Entangled Green Sea Turtle in Hawaii. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts4

A juvenile Kemp's Ridley sea turtle ingested a balloon. (Credit: Blair Witherington)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts5

A deceased Laysan Albatross lies on the ground in Midway Atoll, with an exposed stomach filled with debris it consumed around its coastal habitat. Marine animals cannot digest debris and often die due starvation. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts6

NOAA diver works to release a green sea turtle entangled in a derelict fishing net in Hawaii. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts7

NOAA divers release seal from marine debris entanglement. Entanglement in derelict fishing gear can lead to injury or death in marine organisms. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts8

Marine debris throughout the ocean puts endangered species like this Hawaiian monk seal at risk. (Photo: NOAA)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Impacts9

A curious Laysan Albatross checks out a toothbrush on the beach. Last year the Marine Debris team removed 705 toothbrushes and personal care items from the shorelines of Midway Atoll. (Photo Credit: NOAA CREP)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Solutions1

Last year, the Marine Debris team removed 1,268 rubber slippers (flip-flops) and shoes from the shorelines of Midway Atoll. (Photo Credit: NOAA CREP)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Solutions2

The Marine Debris team removing derelict fishing nets from North Beach, Sand Island, Midway Atoll. (Photo Credit: NOAA CREP)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Solutions3

NOAA diver, Russell Reardon, removes derelict fishing gear from impacted reef habitat as part of a 21-day marine debris survey and removal effort at Midway Atoll. In 2013, a total of 14 metric tons (13,795 kg) of derelict fishing gear and plastic debris from impacted reefs and shoreline were removed at the atoll. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Solutions4

NOAA divers stand on a pile of nets they removed in Hawaii's Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Solutions5

A Black-footed albatross sits among a beach filled with derelict fishing net. The marine debris team worked to remove these items that create an entanglement risk. (Photo Credit: NOAA CREP)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Trash1

Debris along the eastern shoreline of Eastern Island. This photo is a before shot from the 2016 marine debris removal mission. (Credit: NOAA PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Program)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Trash2

This photo, taken after a 21-day marine debris removal effort by the Pacific Island Fisheries Service Coral Reef Ecosystem Division, shows 4,781 bottle caps collected from Midway Atoll's shoreline. Most plastic bottle caps are made from polypropylene, also known as plastic #5-- a hard, durable plastic that can be difficult to recycle in some municipalities. (No credit required)

DOWNLOAD

NOAA-Trash3

Mylar balloons found at the Long Beach Peninsula. This type of balloon is often used for parties and celebrations, as can be seen by the messages and images often displayed on them. (Photo Credit: Russ Lewis)

DOWNLOAD

Topic Paper: Entanglement

An excellent summary of the problem of entanglement

VIEW

Topic Paper: Ghost Fishing

An excellent summary of the problem of ghost fishing

VIEW

Topic Paper: Ingestion

An excellent summary of the problem of ingestion of plastic trash by ocean animals

VIEW

TRASH TALK Special Feature

The full fifteen-minute long Regional Emmy® Award-Winning "Trash Talk" special feature about how, "unfortunately, the ocean is being filled with trash. And people all over the world who care about the health of the ocean are doing something about it. They’re talking trash and taking action. You probably already recycle, and that’s a great start. So now, let’s talk about how you can prevent some of the surprising and sneaky ways that trash flows into our rivers and the ocean. Come learn about marine debris and be part of the action." The special feature is comprise of six chapters that also can be used on their own: "What is marine debris?," "Where does marine debris come from?," "Why is plastic marine debris so common?," "What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?" and the excellent conclusion, "What can we do about marine debris?"


VIEW

What is Marine Debris?

A comprehensive poster file that covers various aspects of the issue, and can be printed in full or in part

DOWNLOAD